Cindie Weldy - Art

Mishawaka Catholic School Mission Statement

  Mishawaka Catholic School builds disciples to Jesus Christ through fatih formation, academic excellence and service to others in accordance with the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

 

www.mcmish.org

I have had the priviledge of teaching for the Fort Wayne Diocese for over 17 years. I absolutely love teaching art.  As an art teacher, I am constantly searching and reflecting on the work that my students produce.  They inspire me. When parents tell me that their child comes home and works on another project identical to what I taught them in class, it tickles my heart  and I am filled with joy!  I accomplished my main objective, give them a love for art and the confidence to know they will succeed.

 

 

Use the link below to access the Indiana Visual Arts Standards.

 www.doe.in.gov/standards

 Just one of my amazing resources used to teach art to my students.  I use transparencies of art works from all over the globe to give your students exposure to appreciating cultural diversity, studying artists and artifacts.  They see the works magnified on the screen as we talk of aesthetics/art criticism, art history, and artist profile. Click on the link below to see one of the important resources I use to expose your child to art in my classroom.  

 http://www.mcgrawhill.ca/school/schoolGraphics/mhr_sra2009_finearts.pdf

 BRING YOUR SUMMER ART BINGO CARD THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS TO BE PLACED IN A DRAWING FOR A BAG OF ART SUPPLIES!  ONE DRAWING AT EACH CAMPUS! 

 WINNERS:

ST. MONICA   -  JOHN MOLNAR

ST. JOSEPH - TAYLOR GEIGER

ST. BAVO  -  ASA HIVICK

YOUR CHILD'S ARTWORK IS MY PASSION

Your child will make a portfolio that will be kept at school until the end of the school year.  Your artist's work is housed in the portfolio to keep it in pristine condition. You are welcome to come in and peruse your child's portfolio through out the year.  I will hang art in the schools throughout the year with an art walk during special times like Parent/teacher conferences, Catholic School Openhouse in January, Lenten Fish Fry at the Mishawaka Catholic St. Bavo's and Spring Art Shows.   

 

 

 WANT TO DONATE?

Art teachers are pack rats.  We are always in search of free treasures that can be used to make wonderful art.  13 years ago, I put an addition on my house.  I told my carpenters to save all the wood scraps for me.  I still have a little bit left, but soon my supply will be gone.  If there are free surplus supplies that you know that I would treasure, could you send them my way?  I would so appreciate it!  

Here are some examples of things my classes could use:

St. Monica art room is in need of blinds for a few windows.  I use the overhead to project art work on transparencies for the artists to study and critique.  I love having the windows free from obstruction but we can not adequately see the wonderful art work very well.  I think if there were blinds on 2/3 of the windows near the overhead (the northside of the room), it might darken enough for us to see better!  I would only use the blinds when we are viewing transparencies. I would so appreciate the donation, my artists would too!  Let me know if this is something that you would like to do for our Middle School Artists!

 Cheap sytrofoam plates

Kleenex

Corrugated cardboard

Thin cardboard

Wood scraps

Yarn: solids, textures, variegated etc.

String or twine

Beads

Silk flowers

Buttons

Fabrics

Felts

Old calendars featuring artists, animals, landscapes, flowers, birds, etc.

Wire

Colored Sharpies

Treasures that I did not even know I couldn't live without!  

 

 See what my wonderful K - 8 art classes WILL BE working on!

 

The students will make a portfolio where they will store their artwork.  The portfolio will remain at school and then be sent home at the end of the year. 

The artists start off the year by making a line collage.  Line is the foundation of art.  They will use construction paper in various colors and sizes. The collages will display the 5 kinds of lines and line quality. Ask them what the 5 lines are and have them explain to you what line quality is.   


The students are learning about Charles Sheeler, American, Incantation, 1946.  Sheeler is known for his modern industrial scenes that he painted, drew and photographed.
They will also study a Maya-Huipil weaving and discuss the way the craftsman used different lines forming pattern in the work. The students made a line collage which is displayed as a collaborative work on the upper level at St. Joseph campus.  

Paul J Wonner belongs to the realist revival.  Most of his compositions were taken directly from photographic sources.  Wonner is also known for the exact opposite, representational art.  The students will study Dutch Still Life with Art Books and Field Guide to Western Birds, 1982.  They will set up a still life and concentrate on contour and shape, geometric and free-form shapes.  

The students will make a value scale of 5 starting with white, gray, grayer, grayest, and black. They will demonstrate their skill using pencil.  They will learn about techniques for shading such as stippling, hatching, and cross-hatching. 

Elizabeth Catlett, African-American artist, used her artistic talent to comment on the African-American experience for civil rights and the end to oppression.  The students use her work Sharecropper, 1970, as an inspiration for applying value by stippling, hatching and cross-hatching skills.

I learned how you use your art for the service of people, struggling people, to whom only realism is meaningful.  Elizabeth Catlett

Artist create depth in their work by using detail, size, placement, overlap, and color.  Each one is used carefully with effort to create an illusion of space in their work.  Artists develope this skill at different phases in their art experience.  Some adults never obtain this benchmark of art awareness.  Does that make them any less or better than another artist?  How can you grade amazing?  In  my 20 years of teaching kids art, I see this glimmer of awareness starting in the 3rd grade.  My fifth grade artists demonstrated their understanding of depth in their fall tempera landscapes.  They used several techniques to show texture in their work: corrugated cardboard, sponges, and brush (wet and dry brush).  My experience with young artists is to instill confidence in them during the conceptional stage, the preliminary sketches and practice.  When they do the painting, the process is much more familiar and satisfying with a little experience to guarantee success.  Craftsmanship is present in the painting.  Remember, there is an art in the process as well in the product.  So when you go through your child's portfolio, ask them why they were successful.    

Form is an element of art that can be measured 3 ways: length, width, and depth.  In 2-dimensional art, artists create the illusion of form using various techniques.  They use shading techniques to create a different quality of texture. We have used hatching, cross-hatching, stippling and now we are using blending.  We studied the way that light is reflected on an object and how one side is in shadow and the other is highlighted by the light source. The students are making an outer space composition.  They will demonstrate depth in their work by using various sizes of spheres in space.  They will determine where their light source is coming from and shadow and blend turning a circle into a sphere.  The students will blend pastel on dark blue construction paper. Adding black to a color makes a shade of the color.  Adding white to a color makes a tint of the color. 
The students are always amazed and delighted to watch a shape turn into a form on a 2 dimensional surface.  

M. C. Escher's work  has been used to illustrate theories in chemistry, geology, physics and psychology. His work is truly amazing and intriguing to the eye.  Mathematicians look at his work as genius. Yet, Escher didn't like or understand math which made his math colleagues shake their heads in disbelief. What continues to baffle me is that some of his art teacher's looked at his ability as ordinary! ("How embarrassing for them," was one of my student's reply, when I was telling the students about Escher.) We studied Sky and Water and Reptiles. We learned about progressive reversal and tessellation.  The students had already talked about tessellation in Math class. The students will make a preliminary tessellation and then move on to their final tessellation drawing.  Tessellations are challenging.  So many variables must be  followed in order to be successful.  Careful attention to measurement is one of those variables.
My work is a game, a very serious game.  M. C. Escher  
One of my former students was related to M. C. Escher.  They brought in an original signed print to show the class.  What an honor for all!



Vincent Van Gogh wrote over 800 letters to his brother Theo.  In those letters you can get to know the artist very well. Theo's wife, Johanna had the foresight to keep all the letters and later they were published.  I refer to them when teaching about the life of Van Gogh.  I like to know first hand how an artist feels about their artwork rather than relying on what others say about them.  The students created a torn paper project of Starry Night.  They studied the choppy broken lines that Van Gogh used in his paintings.  They listened to Josh Groban and Don McLean singing Starry, Starry Night.  We talked about the way the artist showed movement in the swirling stars and wind and how the cypress tree looks to be stretching toward the heavens.  In one of the letters, Van Gogh comments about how no one else sees cypress trees like he does.  No one has captured them the way he interprets them.  If you study his work you will see that they reoccur over and over in his work. 
There is a quote that I love by Van Gogh, it is something that we should all emulate.
I am seeking, I am striving, I am in it with all my heart.  Vincent Van Gogh


In fifth grade, I really push the students to demonstrate value in their work.  They made a value scale using pencil earlier in the year.  Now they are demonstrating colors in value.  They students were to work on a 12 x 12 white piece of drawing paper, place a 8 X 8 heart shape in the middle and divide the heart in to sections.  The back ground was then divided into different sections.  The heart was colored in using warm values.  The background was colored in using cool values.  Warm colors pop out.  Cool colors recede.  It was fun to hear them take pride in their work, I heard lots of positive comments about the project. Since I have 2 classes of 5th and due to the fact that one class is a project ahead of the other, one class did a different warm and cool study using their hand. The background was a black silhouette.  

Jasper Johns is an American artist who received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Obama.  What a high honor, Alexander Calder was the last artist to receive this award in the 1970's.  Johns' work became widely noticed after he painted a painting of the American flag. The fifth grade artists have been studying Johns' Cups 4 Picasso, 1972,  and trying their hand at making optical illusions.  They are learning about positive and negative space.  This is a very challenging project. A lot of preliminary practice goes into the work before the final outcome.  The students must make a positive shape of a chalice leaving the negative space as two profiles looking at each other nose to nose.  
WHEN SOMETHING IS NEW TO US, WE TREAT IT AS AN EXPERIENCE.  WE FEEL THAT OUR SENSES ARE AWAKE AND CLEAR.  WE ARE ALIVE.  JASPER JOHNS

Many festivals in many cultures use  Kinetic Puppetry as part of their celebrations.  The students studied 2 cultures Indonesia and Hopi learning about materials and characteristics these cultures use in their puppet presentations.  The art students love this project.  It challenges them to plan out a puppet that will have 1 movable part.  They must do a preliminary sketch demonstrating how the parts will be constructed and planned out.  Then they move on to seeing their plan take flight.  The students are to make an underwater sea puppet. They will use black construction paper outlining details with nonrun glue.  Once the glue is dry, they apply chalk, set the chalk with hairspray for fixative, make a backing, then insert a dowel rod on both parts of their creature.  The kinetic puppets are beautiful.  Every year, I wish that we could put on a little presentation for the younger classes, but time constraints are always an issue.  One of these years we will do it.      

Gustav Klimt, Austrian artist was transformed by the breathtaking mosaics he studied in Italy.  The inspiration influenced his style.  We studied Tree of Life, the lovely graceful filigree design and then stood at the artroom window carefully examining trees in the neighborhood.  I like to take the kids outside, and stand under a tree looking straight up the trunk and study the limb and branch structure.  But, the weather has not cooperated. The students drew a tree using the swirling mosaic like technique that he is so famous for.  They then used construction paper crayons to fill in tessarae and put watercolor over the work.  


 

The students will make a portfolio where they will store all of the years artwork.  It will be sent home at the end of the school year.  

We begin the year studying a contemporary Native American artist by the name of Jaune-Quick-To-See-Smith.  The students are aware of the social conscience of this artist.  As a Native American, she is so sensitive to the world in which we live.  She has a passion to incorporate her native heritage into her artwork.  Using Crayola marker and Sharpie marker the students use words and personal symbols to relay a message of who they are in their artwork. 
FOR WHATEVER HAPPENS TO THE PLANTS AND ANIMALS ALSO HAPPENS TO THE HUMANS. CS1854

T C STEELE MEETS ERIC CARLE.  T C Steele is one of the Hoosier Group of artists that is part of Indiana's rich art history.  He was an Impressionist painter who did some incredible landscapes, still life  and portraits.  We studied his landscape paintings and discovered our beautiful Indiana scenery exploding with color and contour.  The students sponge painted 2 -12 X 18 pieces of paper. 1 was painted with cool colors; the other paper was painted with warm colors.  Ths students used the cool color paper for background and then layered construction paper to represent foreground, middle ground and background.  Each layer was lighter in value as it moved farther back into the landscape.  They cut out a silhouette of a tree from solid dark paper and then cut leaves from the warm painted paper overlapping the fall foilage.   The collages are beautiful, each artist using unique approaches to demonstrate depth in the landscape.  

The artists will learn about gesture drawing.  Every year I am made aware of how out of shape I am.  Since I want all students as artists, the only model is me!  I stand on the table and hold a pose for 30+ seconds.  The students have to quickly sketch the action that I am doing.  We do a class period of this, so I am pretty sore for the next couple days. It is so much fun to watch them carefully and frantically get down the movement. I remind them that this is only an exercise in drawing.   We are leaning to train the hand to move the direction that the eye tells it to go.  We will be looking at the art work of Audrey Flack, an American artist who is known for photo realism.  Photo realism looks like a photograph and is so carefully and perfectly put together.  We will look at a self-portrait she did that is in a much looser style that she is so famous for.  So, strike a pose and ask your artist to draw you as a gesture drawing! 

The students studied contour, the outer edge of an object.  They carefully studied the object making sure that the applied line depicted the object in front of them.  They also experienced what blind contour is, keeping the eye on the object while the hand that is drawing is covered with cloth.  You can not look at the paper until the contour drawing is complete.  This trains the hand to follow the movement of the EYE.  You should have heard the giggles when they were able to look at the drawing.  Try it with your artist.  It is great fun!!!

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.  The students studied the work of Benny Andrews, The Scholar and Patriots, examining how he used contour line while drawing the human figure.  They then drew their art teacher who sat on a table for 30 minutes and tried her best not to move.  (IMPOSSIBLE to conduct a class and stay perfectly still.)  The results always tickle me, to watch the expressions on their faces while they try their personal best to draw what they see, me.  Some students apologize over their endeavor and I remind them that they can not insult me, look at all the different artists we have studied over the years.  There aren't 2 of them that draw identically. One artist is not "better" than another, artists have different styles and approaches.I remind them that sometimes process is as important as product.  Be patient. Stretch. Grow.

I want my images of people to give off a feeling of being real.  By real, I don't mean rendering them in photography, but rather something more abstract, something more than what the viewer usually sees.  
Benny Andrews  1995.

"Sticky fingers."  "Yuck."  "I love to peel glue from my fingers."  These are some of the comments that go around the room while working on a tissue paper collage.  The students looked at the art of Minnie Evans, an American artist who felt called at 43 to be an artist.  She had no formal training in art but felt led by the Holy Spirit and her dreams to do art.  She started with crayon and then moved on with other medium as her art progressed.  Some of her work was done in collage.  She worked as a gatekeeper for Arlie Gardens where she was exposed to the beauty of a garden setting.  Her work is elaborate in design  and full of vivid color.  
The students made a flower garden collage using tissue paper and glue.  They worked with geometric and free-form shapes. Mrs. Lehmann has been talking about erosion in Science class so it was a perfect opportunity to discuss that planting grass in the midst of your flowers will help keep erosion from taking place.  It also is a use of foreground and keeps your flowers from looking like they are floating in the air.  Plant the roots deep into the soil, I reminded them.  Art class is a perfect place to reinforce learning in other subjects too.

George Catlin is one of my heroes in art.  He had a passion and a purpose for a people he prophesied would be changed forever by the invasion of  their homes, culture, spiritual persuasion,  and land.  He lived with and documented the lives of several tribes of Native American people.  I introduced the students to Buffalo Bull's Back Fat, Head Chief. Blood Tribe (Blackfoot), 1832.  It is located in the National Museum of Art, Washington, DC. I also went on the George Catlin website and showed them 20 or so other paintings depicting the lives of the people indigenous to our United States.  Our history is a history of persecution for many ethnic groups.  The students are taught more of persecution in their Indiana History focus in 4th grade.  
I have a rich library that I share with the students. Many examples of artifacts are shown to them to enhance their appreciation of Native American art and history.
The students make "leather" shields filled with symbols and story using a border to finish their shield.  They embellish the work with yarn, feathers and beads.  
Nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from becoming their historian.  George Catlin

Flowing rhythm is created by repeating curved lines or shapes.  There are no sudden changes in lines or breaks in the movement.  Free form shapes that are repeated can sometimes create a flowing rhythm.  The students looked at Katsushika Hokusai, Kajikazawa from The Thirty-six Views of Fuji, 1823-29 and Allan Houser, Coming of Age, 1977.  We compared the woodblock print to the bronze sculpture and discovered the  ways that artists express flowing rhythm in a variety of medium.  The students are using 2 different colors of construction paper, cutting a variety of curving lines and long, flowing free-form shapes.  This project is very challenging to get the flow just right.  When the objective is achieved the satisfaction is amazing.  

I first please myself.  If I don't please myself, no one else will be pleased.  Allan Houser

We continue our study of visual rhythm by using a poinsettia leaf motif.  The students dipped the sponge onto their palette of red tempera and created a poinsettia flower. They then created a background of tints of green demonstrating rhythm throughout the painting.  Detail to the flower was done with the end of their brush dipped in yellow to represent the stamens.  We hope to display our flowers during the Christmas season.

Joan Miro, Symbols and Love Constellations of a Woman, 1941 was the inspiration for the artist's nonobjective  project.  The students used rhythm in many ways to create visual moment.  Nonobjective works use line, shape and color.  We did a collaborative collage using various shapes, sizes and colors of  construction paper and black yarn.  It worked very well.  Each student added their own shape to the work.  They were encouraged to cut free form and geometric shapes.  When the students felt like they were finished with the shapes, strategically placing them down with glue they used black yarn to complete their work.  
My way is to seize an image the moment it has formed in my mind, to trap it as a bird and to pin it at once to canvas.  Afterward I start to tame it, to master it.  I bring it under control and I develop it.  Joan Miro

We are working on a winterscape of birch trees and birds.  It is a mixed media piece that will take several classes to accomplish with fantastic results.  I have been busy developing new projects and this one I absolutely can't wait to see come together.  I had a blast working out all the details, very very rewarding.  I would love to have it all come together for display at the Catholic Schools Openhouse.  CROSS YOUR FINGERS AND NO SNOW DAYS.  

What would a snowman man look like from different points of view?  The artists' demonstrated their awareness of point of view by making a snowman from 4 points of view:  from straight ahead, side view, behind and bird's eye view.  They really are something to hang on to and frame for next season!


ROBERT INDIANA was born in New Castle, Indiana in 1928.  He was born Robert Clark, but changed his name because he wanted to stand out.  There were a lot of artists named Clark.  Boy, am I glad that he changed his name because for my Fourth graders, it makes them able to identify an Indiana artist! He is famous for his LO
                     VE   paintings, postage stamps, and sculpture.  Take your artist down to the Indianapolis Museum of Art sometime to see his work.  The sculpture is located in front of the museum. It would make a great family photograph.
The students made their own interpretation of the LO
                                                                        VE  paintings using pastel and watercolor resist.  The are 
LOVELY!!!!!!  :)

Grant Wood is well known for his American Gothic painting.  He was an Iowan and portrayed rural Midwest America in his own unique style. If you are in Chicago, please take a couple hours and visit the Art Institute.  You can see it up close and personal!  Your artist would love to spend an afternoon exploring the floors at the Art Institute.  We are studying Woods rural landscapes.  In order to really get to know an artist you have to look at a body of work.  I take my computer table by table and discuss with each group how he used perspective to show depth in his work.  We talk about size, placement, color, detail, overlap, foreground, middle ground, background, horizon line, and vanishing point. We looked at how his work takes the eye through a rural landscape up and down rows of crops and down country dirt roads.  We go out in the hallway and watch how vanishing point works.  I also tell the students that there are mathematical equations that can help determine where vanishing point should appear in a drawing.  Grant uses different patterns to stylize his vegetation and trees.  The artists are creating landscapes in pencil and then using texture plates under their work, they take unwrapped crayons and make a rubbing to expose the texture underneath.  It is a fantastic project, they love to experiment with different patterns and colors layered on top of each other. It makes me feel right at home, as if I am looking out of my picture window at my little Wakarusa farming community. 
All the good ideas I ever had came to me while I was milking a cow.  GRANT WOOD

Henri Matisse, a French artist, made bright colorful paper collages in simple shapes and became famous from a style of art called fauvism, in French means wild beast. It was not a compliment to the Fauvist but the name for the movement stuck.  His paintings are full of a variety of different patterns.  Henri Matisse, The Fish Bowl, is the inspiration for our paper collage project.  The students will be using tissue paper, wallpaper, construction paper, watercolor and salt.  The project is one of my favorites, but aren't they all!
I would not mind turning into a vermillion goldfish.  Henri Matisse

Jean Statton Porter was an amazing Hoosier Artist.  She was a naturalist, photographer, writer, poet, a movie producer and activist.  She knew that draining the Indiana Swamps would change the native ecosystem forever.  One of those changes would be the moth and butterfly population.  She was right. Many of the winged beauties have become extinct.  She made extensive collections of them to preserve for history.   Her home is found in Lagro, Indiana near Wabash, Indiana.  You can tour her home on the lake, and walk the beautiful gardens.  I have taken art classes to her home and watched the children explore the grounds and sketch the beauty they discover.
The artists were to create a floral crayon and water color resist painting.  They then were to pick out 2 butterflies or moths to add to their painting using symmetry.  

I love my job and I love teaching your students new things that I learn.  During Spring Break I went to the Midwest Museum of Art in Elkhart.  Been there dozens of times, mostly with my girls during summer breaks, took a class from the curator years ago, and for some reason this time I am so pumped and excited to do a new 4th grade Indiana History lesson about Overbeck pottery.  This time my visit was different, there were no time restraints, my kiddos are old kiddos now and I am on Spring Break all by myselfm :(. (Parents, cherish your time with your children because someday, you will wish you had spring break with your kids again.)  I had time to putz and write down ideas and research and I am in awe of Overbeck pottery.  Now, I hope I will be able to cram it in my plans!

  

 
 
IMPORTANT PROJECT DUE DATES
 
 
 
 BRING YOUR COMPLETED BINGO CARD THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS TO BE PLACED IN A DRAWING FOR A BAG OF ART SUPPLIES!  ONE DRAWING AT EVERY CAMPUS!
 
ST. MONICA WINNER - JOHN MOLNAR
 
 
 
 
 
 THE ENTIRE MIDDLE SCHOOL IS DOING A DREAM CATCHER TO HANG ALL OVER THE BUILDING IN THE HALL WAY INSPIRED BY JEREMIAH 29:11.  THE STUDENTS NEED TO BRING IN FABRIC, RIBBON, LACE, BEADS, EMBELLISHMENTS THAT SYMBOLIZE WHO THEY ARE AND WHAT THEY FEEL REPRESENTS HOW GOD MADE THEM UNIQUE FROM EVERYONE ELSE.  THIS PROJECT IS DUE OCTOBER 9TH, 2017.
        
 
MAKEUP WORK-
        I WILL BE AT ST. MONICA ON WEDNESDAY MORNINGS FROM 7:30 AM - 8:00 AM DURING THE 2017 - 2018 SCHOOL YEAR TO MAKE UP WORK WITH ANY STUDENT WHO MISSED CLASS THE WEEK BEFORE.  STUDENTS MUST MAKE UP WORK PRIOR TO CLASS.  CLASS TIME SHOULD BE SPENT ON THE CURRENT WEEK'S WORK NOT ON MAKEUP WORK RESULTING IN TAKING AWAY PRECIOUS CLASSTIME FROM STUDENTS WHO ARE WORKING ON THE CURRENT PROJECT.  WORK MAY ALSO NEED TO GO HOME SO THAT THE STUDENT IS READY AND ON SCHEDULE WITH THEIR CURRENT PROJECT.   PLEASE USE THIS TIME FOR MAKEUP WORK.  I WANT TO ASSIST YOU DURING THIS TIME GIVING YOU THE OPPORTUNITY TO MAKEUP THE WORK.     
 
 
 
 ENRICHMENT -  ARTISTS NEED TO BRING IN THEIR WEAVING SUPPLIES
                             2ND YEAR WEAVERS NEED TO BRING IN THEIR OWN LOOM AND                                                      SUPPLIES.
 

 

 

 

 Students will create a portfolio and notebook/journal that will be used to showcase their artwork, reflections, and note taking.  The notebook is a study guide for quizzes and tests.  The reflections let me know how they are critiquing their own artwork and the work of others.

 
The students will begin the year by feeling the outer contour of objects in a bag.  They reach into the bag and feel the contour of the object.  Without looking into the bag, they draw what the hand feels.  They then take the object out of the bag and do a direct observation drawing of the object.  This is a great exercise to train the artists to draw what they see, paying close attention to the contour of the observation. We then will move on to looking at details within the object, paying close attention to value and textures.  

 

Students will study contour and define different values in an object.  Several still life drawings will be assigned.  They will work in pencil and colored pencil. 

Value is the lightness and darkness of a color.  They will refer to the value scale while they work on pencil drawings.  The human eye can detect 19 values in an object. 

Non-objective is a composition in line, shape and color.  The artists will do a monochromatic tempera painting in the color of their choice. They will use at least 6 values in their painting.  

The artists studied the work of Georgia O'Keefe, American artist who treasured the dried bleached bones and landscape of the desert and the fresh dew on a flower in full bloom. They learned to see the beauty in all things through the eyes of an extraordinary woman.  The students were encouraged to do a preliminary drawing of a flower, paying close attention to the contour of each petal.  After a satisfactory sketch was done they worked on a final contour drawing on watercolor paper.  Each petal was traced over with a thick outline of glue. The next couple days, careful attention was given to the values in the flower.  When the watercolor dried, ultra fine point sharpie was used to accentuate the contour and a few color changes.  Amazing results were accomplished by my middle school artists.  I am truly blessed by their work.

Nobody sees a flower -really-it is so small it takes time-we haven't time-and to see takes time, like to have a friend takes time.  Georgia O'Keeffe  
If you take a flower in your hand and really look at it, it's your world for a moment.  Georgia O'Keeffe
I can't live where I want to, I can't go where I want to go, I can't do what I want to, I can't even say what I want to.  I decided I was a very stupid fool not to at least paint as I wanted to. Georgic O'Keeffe 

Victor Vaserely is know as the grandfather of Op Art. There is a wonderful "official" website put together by his daughter that I let the students observe during our discussion of the history and culmination of his work.  His optical illusions are spellbinding.  Art 1 students demonstrated their skill by doing a black sharpie on white paper.  Our goal was to make the viewer "feel sick" when they studied the drawing.  I must say that we accomplished our Op Art objective.
Bridget Riley is also well known for her Op Art.  The students used the outline of their hand to create a wonderful line drawing that gives the impression that the hand is coming out of the paper.  

Each year that I have had the privilege teaching for the diocese, I have entered the  YOU CAN LEND A HAND poster contest.  It fits perfectly in my Graphic Arts Unit.  The students find out first hand what it is like to design a poster for our client, Quality Dining.  In my years, I have had many winners.  Picasso said, "if you are going to copy, copy from the very best."  I line up all the winners on the board and we look at the characteristics that are common among the winners.  The layout, logo, typeface (font), measuring device and slogan are all carefully scrutinized. Over the years, the slogan has not changed but the company logo's have changed.  Working for a couple companies prior to teaching, I know how important logo's are.  The logo is the proud symbol that a company displays for advertising and marketing purposes.  My students critique the preliminary layouts and give helpful input to each student's poster before the final is sent.   The final poster entries have been mailed to Quality Dining.  The winning poster will be notified December .   THANK YOU QUALITY DINING FOR MAKING MY GRAPHIC ARTS UNIT SO MEANINGFUL.

 


The process of printmaking is an art.  So many variables contribute to a successful print.  Putting the right amount of ink on the brayer, applying the right amount of pressure on the plate, making sure that the entire surface is being attended to, making sure that the engraving is deep enough, and registration is precisely at the right spot, clean surface, clean fingers are just a few things that go into the process to ensure a good print.   First year students are using Styrofoam for their prints, second year students are using linoleum.  
We have been working on technique the past week.  The second set of prints will be graded on technique and composition.  The students have worked in pairs helping each other with the printmaking process.
 

The 6th grade  class has a homework assignment due MARCH 18TH: THEY ARE TO STUDY THE WAY THAT THE FULL MOON CASTS SHADOWS ON THE FRIGID WHITE SNOW COVERED CANVAS.  They are working on a mixed media winter landscape. The results are beautiful and very successful.
WHOSE WOODS THESE ARE I DO NOT KNOW.  HIS HOUSE IS IN THE VILLAGE THOUGH.  HE WILL NOT SEE ME STOPPING HERE TO WATCH HIS WOODS FILL UP WITH SNOW.  ROBERT FROST  

The students used their profiles to create self identity portraits.  They could use medium of their choice.  They filled in the profile with symbols depicting characteristics of what makes them unique.    

The South Bend Museum of Art has offered a banner contest over the past several years.  Each year is a new theme.  Last years theme was in commemoration of South Bend's 150th, "Past, Present, Future."  We will enter this contest as a class, there is no entry fee, and the really exciting part, the art teachers' names go into a drawing for a FREE art class.  Yes, I would love to be the lucky teacher.  But, what would really make me the happiest is if one of my students' entry/entries would be chosen!  This is a mandatory assignment.  It is great for the Second Semester classes to experience a graphic design experience.  The first semester Art Class enters the You Can Lend A Hand contest.
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The artists are using pastels to create a landscape.  They are working on their depth perception perspective skills.  They are to use the five depth techniques: color, overlap, detail, placement, and size.  The landscapes are very impressive. We will have them ready for the art show.


PLEASE STOP BY AND SEE THE BEAUTIFUL ARTWORK THAT IS DISPLAYED BY THE ARTROOM HALLWAYS.  WE HAVE INCREDIBLE TALENT AND YOU REALLY NEED TO SEE WHAT OUR STUDENTS HAVE BEEN WORKING ON.


 

STUDENTS MUST BRING IN MATERIALS FOR THE WEAVING, COLLAGE, SCULPTURE PROJECTS.

Your student's grade will be affected by the lack of planning and preparation that they exhibit.  If they do not come prepared, they will not have the necessary materials to do their projects.  YOUR STUDENT IS FULL AWARE OF WHAT THEY NEED.  I HAVE GONE OVER THIS FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE SEMESTER, HAVE IT POSTED ON THIS SCHOOL WEBSITE AND SENT A LIST HOME.  PLEASE CALL ME IF THERE IS A PROBLEM GETTING THE SUPPLIES.  THE CLASS SUPPLY LISTS STATED  THAT STUDENTS WILL HAVE TO BRING IN SOME SUPPLIES.  THANK YOU.  YOUR STUDENT SHOULD BE SET UP FOR SUCCESS AND NOT FAILURE.  
CURRENT SUPPLIES NEEDED ARE HIGHLIGHTED IN RED.

Artists are responsible for bringing in various materials to complete weaving, collages and sculpture.  A list will be given to students the first week of class.  Students are required to have their materials ready to use when the projects start. Failure to have materials will result in a writing assignment on top of their already required project.  

* ITEMS ARE MANDATORY
*Hoop or embroidery hoop or metal hoop

*Yarn (various textures and colors)

*2 dowel rods at least 12"

*ribbon 

*Dinner fork

*round plastic or wooden embroidery hoop or metal circle atleast 12 inches or larger

lace

*beads (I have pony beads available.  Colors and amounts are limited. Depending on the project you may want to have your own to use.)

buttons

crochet hook

leather/imitation leather strips

twine

string

fabric (Torn/cut into strips)

*dried natural or synthetic silks of leaves or flowers

sea shells

*sticks at least 12 inches

Old jewelry, taking up space in a drawer!

bark

*FOIL, 1 to 2 boxes depending on need  (WE USE A LOT OF FOIL) 

*Cardboard, please have your boxes cut down before class.  Space is limited.

*Cereal box cardboard , please have your box cut down before class.  Space is limited.

*Collage items. (Clean out your closet.  Bring little items that could be used in a collage.)
 
*WOOD SCRAPS, THE STUDENTS MUST BRING IN THESE ITEMS TO COMPLETE A COUPLE PROJECTS.  END PIECES, 12-18 INCHES LONG ARE NEEDED.  I HAVE SUPPLIED THESE USING MY OWN SUPPLY FROM MY ADDITION TO MY HOME 13 YEARS AGO. MY SUPPLY HAS BEEN DEPLETED.  THESE ARE MANDATORY FOR THE SCULPTURES.

*I own 17 wooden picture frames larger than 18 inches that I lend out to students to use.  Because of the size of the classes, 5 students will need to supply their own frames.  The frame should be sturdy wood with the glass removed at home. We use the frame as a loom.  It is mandatory that each student have a frame to weave from.

There may be items that I will add throughout the semester.  Students are always given adequate time to search or purchase these items.  Please check with neighbors, friends, and relatives to see if they would like to donate any of these items to you before purchasing. Wal-mart, Hobby Lobby, Michaels, Goodwill  are some places to purchase these items. Please look for coupons to help out with the cost.



We begin the weaving class using paper strips to do simple and more complicated designs.  Once the students have mastered this, they move on to weaving on a frame using yarns, etc.
They will do 2 weavings.  The first is done with yarns, string, etc.  The second weaving is done with materials from nature.  Students must bring in their own natural materials.  This is the perfect time of year to gather natural materials.  Students ALWAYS have the option of bringing in synthetic/artificial natural objects like silk flowers.  
I am so amazed at the beautiful textures and designs the students create in their weavings.  Second year students are required more sophistication in their work.  They will make a functional use from their weaving like a purse/pouch/bag.  Remember the beautiful table runner that was made for the auction?  Encourage your student to make something that you can display proudly in your home.  
ART PROMOTES SUCH A FEELING OF WORTH AND ACCOMPLISHMENT.  It blesses all who have the opportunity to look at it.  Encourage your students to put in 150% effort in their personal expressions.  CRAFTSMANSHIP is so crucial to artwork.  I want to stimulate personal best in the art room. 

The weavers have been busy completing their first textile weaving.  The weavings have turned out to be very beautiful wall hangings. One challenge they have endured is getting their weaving to NOT turn into a "tornado or hour glass".  They have been expected to keep each vertical side vertical and not zigzag or diagonal. Their first attempts may not have turned out exactly how they visioned them to be.  With patience and skill they will get better. Take a tour down the hallway outside the art room and admire the work that is being done.  YOU WILL LOVE IT!  I SURE DO!

The students were assigned a weaving using materials  found in nature.  They brought in things that fascinated them such as shells, bark, dried flowers, and sticks.  A few used synthetic materials such as silk flowers and leaves.  The weavings are sensational. Come see for yourself!

After reading about the Lakota and Ojibway Native American dream catchers, the students were inspired to create a dream catcher.  Some used a hoop and others used a metal coat hanger formed in a circle.  They wove a spiders web around the circle adding beads to symbolize the spider.  Feathers were added to help guide the good dreams to the one that lies below in slumber. They are all so beautifully made,  a treasure to keep for years to come. Pleasant dreams class.

After looking at the work of Wayne Thiebaud, the students made their own favorite desserts out of model magic and painted them as realistically as possible.  They displayed them on a doily and plate.  We had a tea party mixing in the faux desserts in with the real thing.  It was so much fun photographing the delictable treats.  It was a smashing hit!  I have a love for all things china and tea!  One lump or two?


After viewing a video over mask making around the world, the students were inspired to make a preliminary mask sketch, listing materials, colors, and background the mask will be mounted to.  They are not obligated to stick to their sketch but will use it as a planning stage.  The masks will be made from plaster gauze. Students must make an extension of some kind to the mask.  Plaster really is hard on the hands.  Please send in a moisturizer with your student if they have sensitive skin.  I share hand lotion moisturizer with the artists but a couple of my students have allergies to fragrance.  Your student can bring home any unused portion.  I know that moisturizers for sensitive skin can be expensive.  THANK YOU, I WILL ENCOURAGE YOUR STUDENT TO BRING BACK ANY UNUSED LOTION HOME.

ALBERTO GIACOMETTI is known for his elongated forms.  He created his human figures as if they were the long stretched out shadow of the human form.  The students made a human figures that was to show movement.  They used wire for the armature and wrapped the wire with foil.  They painted the foil over with acrylic paint.

Alexander Calder was an American sculptor who was first trained as a design engineer, not as a sculptor.  As a child, he enjoyed making sculpture from wire and old dishes.  The students studied his wire portraits.  They then made their own self portraits from wire.  

Students are working on their mobiles using wire and aluminum.  They are learning how careful planning is needed to insure proper balance and proportion.


Students will do a subtractive nonobjective sculpture using flora foam.  They will learn to use a rasp.  This is a new material and tool for the artists.  We were fortunate that we were able to add some new materials to the sculpture class this year.  They will learn about the sculptor Henry Moore, English sculptor who created many larger-than-life sculptures in stone, wood, and metals such as lead and bronze. He like to simplify his forms into basic shapes without detail.  Many of Moore's works have family as the theme.  He is viewed as one of the greatest and most original sculptors of the twentieth century.
I am so excited to see the new sculpture! 
Besides the human form, I am tremendously excited by all natural forms, such as cloud formations, birds, trees and their roots, and mountains which are to me the wrinkling of the earth's surface, like drapery.  It is extraordinary how closely ripples in the sand on the seashore resemble the gouge marks in wood carving...I have always been excited about natural strata and the actual forms of stone.  Photographs of places such as the rocky coast of Brittany and big, natural rocks in river beds have always excited me.  I have often drawn rock strata and been influenced by its formations.  Henry Moore

2017/2018 SCHOOL YEAR  STUDENTS MUST BRING IN WOOD SCRAPS FROM 12 - 18 INCHES LONG.  I HAVE TOLD THE STUDENTS THAT THESE ARE NECESSARY TO FINISH THEIR SCULPTURES.  PLEASE SEND THIS ITEM TO SCHOOL.  LOWE'S CUTS WOOD AND HAS END PIECES THAT I AM SURE IF YOU TELL WHY YOU NEED THEM, THEY WOULD BE HAPPY TO LET YOU HAVE THEM.  ASK AROUND, FAMILY AND FRIENDS WHO ARE DOING ANY REMODELING THEY WILL HAVE ENOUGH END PIECES TO SPARE.  DUMPSTER DIVE! I HAVE DONE A LOT OF DUMPSTER DIVING IN MY LIFETIME!

 

 


 

The students will make a portfolio where they will store their artwork.  The portfolio will be sent home at the end of the school year.  


We begin the year by reviewing and continuing awareness of the elements of art.  The students will study American artist Charles Burchfield, Orion in December, 1959.  They will incorporate all 5 lines and line quality in their work using their choice of metallic crayon on black construction paper or marker on the construction paper of their choice.  The students will thinksson plan.We begin the year by reviewing and continuing awareness of the elements of art.  The students will study American artist Charles Burchfield, Orion in December, 1959.  They will incorporate all 5 lines and line quality in their work using their choice of metallic crayon on black construction paper or marker on the construction paper of their choice.  The students will think back on their personal experience looking up at the night sky.  They will then use an explosion of color to create a grand finale firework display. What beautiful colorful art pieces are accomplished through this very success 

AN ARTIST MUST  PAINT NOT WHAT HE SEES IN NATURE BUT WHAT IS THERE.  TO DO SO, HE MUST INVENT SYMBOLS; WHICH, IF PROPERLY USED, MAKES HIS WORK SEEM EVEN MORE REAL THAN WHAT IS IN FRONT OF HIM.  CHARLES BURCHFIELD 1951


Students will learn about the work of Wassily Kandinsky.  He is noted for his non-objective artwork:  line, shape and color.  Kandinsky loved music and was a skilled cellist and pianist.  Many of his works were inspired by attending symphonies.  The music lead him to make some incredible pieces.  While listening to music the artists will create a non-objective mixed media of crayon, sharpie, pastel and watercolor.  

"Color is the keyboard, the eyes are hammers, the soul is the piano with many strings.  The artist is the hand which plays touching one key or another, to cause vibrations of the soul."  Wassily Kandinsky

After reading, IF I HAD A ROBOT by Dan Yaccarino,  the artists were to write how owning a robot could be useful in their lives.  They gave their robot a name and had to list all the jobs the robot would do for them.  Then, they were to create a robot out of construction paper using geometric and free-form shapes making sure that the robot matched the description of the written text.  
The students studied 2 artifacts and were to determine the shapes that were used that showed emphasis in a piece of artwork.

Berenice Abbott was an American photographer who believed in the unaltered photograph featuring the split second as it really appeared in its real form.  The students studied her architectural photos. Her photos document how life was during her life in New York .  If she were alive today, I am not sure she would like some of the digital photography programs.  With the click of a button an artist can change this and that in a photograph without too much effort at all.
The students stood at my art windows with pretend cameras in hand and snapped photographs of their own.  They studied the variety of roofs, windows, and doors and documented some of those in their "Spooky Architect" sharpie, crayon and watercolor mixed media compositions. We have quite the architects at Mishawaka Catholic.  Next, they will try their hand at real estate by writing a for sale ad.  If you are looking for the perfect spooky house, look no further, my architects will whip you up one in no time.  We hope to have them ready for Parent Teacher Conferences.  Cross your finger that we will be done in time!

Many times my private devotions are spent in the Psalms.  It is there that David pours out his faults and failures to our Lord and expresses his grateful praises to the Lord.  We see the lowest of lows and the highest peaks that is very real in the Christian journey.  I love the passages where all creation cries out to our Creator. Nature declares the beauty of God's handiwork.  Fall is such an example of His skill as an artist.  The richness of color and contrasts are so amazing.  The third grade artists demonstrate their beginning understanding of foreground, middle ground, background and horizon line.  They learn how to create tree bark with their crayon and demonstrate their beginning awareness of depth in their work by placing trees in just the right places to create an illusion of space.  Sponges are dipped in yellow paint and applied, then red is added to make orange.   Fall foliage is created before their eyes.  Sometimes we get carried away.  They are reminded not to make a snowman in a snowstorm.  Ask them to explain that Weldyeuphemism to you. 


Faith Ringgold's work speaks of the sad reality of racism in our nation's history.  She is an African American artist who knows first hand what it means to be discriminated against as an African American and a woman artist.  Our communities shape who and what we are. I read Tar Beach to the students pointing out the symbolism of flying throughout the story and explain the cold hard truth of when and why the civil rights movement started in America. Art often responds to the feeling and attitudes of society.  We will look at several of her story quilts.  Ringgold has a wonderful website that is filled with her life's story.  Go on the site for your self and experience the questionnaire she has composed.  It will test and make you do a self-examination of your attitudes on skin color.
The students created their own story quilt of a memorable time with their family.  Wallpaper is used in place of a fabric border creating a colorful frame around their crayon drawing.  

Sculpture is form, it has height, it has width, it has depth.  The students studied Yves Tanguy, Indefinite Divisibility and Emily Carr, SKY.  Both are landscapes and emphasize the use of cool colors.  The students then created cool color landscape paper sculptures. Cool colors are blue, green and violet. They were to have at least 2 trees of different heights, a body of water and include vegetation. They were encouraged to add personal details.  The students had to use their critical thinking skills to demonstrate balance in their work.  How tall is too tall when making your tree?  How will you make it stand tall and not topple over?  How will you decide to layout the composition?  I always remind them that there are many ways to go about the objectives, this is just one or two of the ways to attempt them.  Art is the perfect opportunity for trial and error and very, very, very fascinating happy accidents that really, really work!
YOU TAKE WHAT YOU GOT AND YOU MAKE IT WORK!  MRS. WELDY

Jim Dine is an American artist who loved to use hearts, bathrobes, tools and Pinocchio in his work.  The students made hearts from crayon and then covered the empty space surrounding the hearts in watercolor.  Their work will warm your heart and I think some of these would look wonderful framed and hung in your house!
 
Wilson Bentley, known as Snowflake Bentley, was a life long photographer and scientist.  He was a very patient and dedicated artist who photographed snowflakes.  Because of his work, we know that no two snowflakes are exactly alike.  His parents believed in his work as a child and sold cows to come up with the money needed to buy a camera capable of demonstrating his love of nature through photography.  
The third grade artists spent time using different materials to paint tempera on paper by using string, sponge, spray from a toothbrush and sparkle.  They then practiced symmetry by folding the beautiful paper and cutting designs.  It is so rewarding to hear their surprised comments of how beautiful their designs are.  They used  a variety of sizes to demonstrate depth in their work, overlapping and then adding tiny little glittery sparkles in the background. 
I loved developing this project for them.  Many of my ideas come from children's literature.  I try to use literature in my lessons whenever I can. 
The snow crystals...come to us not only to reveal the wondrous beauty of the minute Nature, but to teach us that all earthly beauty is transient and must soon fade away.  But through the beauty of the snow in evanescent, like the beauties of autumn, as of the evening sky it fades but to come again.  
WILSON A. BENTLEY

We will be working on the color wheel the next couple weeks.  The students will paint paper in primary, secondary, and intermediate colors.  They will then make a motif that will carry out all 12 colors on their color wheel.  They learn that all the colors are made from the primary colors. We talk about analogous and monochromatic color schemes too. Students love to paint, it is so much fun to watch their expressions and hear the comments they make when they walk into the room and see the painting supplies ready for their class project.   The mess is so worth it!!!!!

The students used the leftover paper from the color wheel and made beautiful mosaic butterflies.  The paper tessarae they made is so vivid and rich in color.  The results are beautiful.

The seahorse tempera paintings are impressive.  I hope you get a chance to see the art show, I will be putting up one of the 3rd grade classes tempera paintings.

Monet's waterlily pond was the inspiration for the watercolor and tissue paper waterlily mixed media composition.  They look so springy and we all are in the mood for spring.




 

 
THE STUDENTS WILL MAKE A PORTFOLIO FOR STORING THEIR WORK.  THEY WILL BRING HOME THEIR PORTFOLIO AT THE END OF THE SCHOOL YEAR.

WHAT I LOVE BEST ABOUT KINDERS IS THEIR CONFIDENCE AND HONESTY.  IT IS SOMETHING THAT UNFORTUNATELY,  DOESN'T STAY WITH US TOO LONG.  IN KINDERGARTEN, MY ART IS THE BEST AND YOUR ART IS THE BEST; WE ALL ARE THE BEST!  THAT IS SOOO REFRESHING.  

I use children's literature a lot in Kindergarten.  It gets the student's schemata activated and ready for the lesson.  I also like to use music in the art room.  If you walk by, it isn't unusual to hear us singing.  I don't have the greatest voice but the kids don't care so we all give it our very best and we all sound fantastic!  
DOT, DOT, DOT AND YOU DON'T USE A LOT!  We rhyme in the art room.  Rhyming is a precursor to reading, so I take all the teachable moments I can and jam them in the time we have.  

Harold and the Purple Crayon is a book I often pull and read.  The Kinders learned about an American Artist W. H. Brown, Bareback Riders, 1886.   Not much is known about this artist because he wasn't "famous".  He taught himself to paint because he enjoyed it.  We call these artists, folk artists.  But, his painting of the circus inspired many to draw a circus scene.  Cameras were not in use yet, so artists documented their experiences by painting pictures.  I read Harold's adventure at the circus and turned on some circus music to get us in the Big Top Mood.  We walked a tight rope in the room!  Mrs. Whitfield's are hanging in the cafeteria.  Come by and see them!

Kenny Scharf, American, When Worlds Collide, 1984 along with Mercer Mayer's, Nightmare in My Closet was the inspiration  for our closet compositions.  Each student drew a free form shape and filled in the details of a creature they would not like to see in their bedrooms at home.  They then selected a color for their closet door and placed a door knob in the right place for the viewer to open the door and experience their horrible and zany creatures!

THE STUDENTS EXPERIMENTED WITH BLENDING AND TEXTURE USING YELLOW AND ORANGE TEMPERA.  THEY CUT OUT 3 DIFFERENT SIZES OF PUMPKINS AND OVERLAPPED THEM SHOWING DEPTH.  THE BLACK BACK GROUND WAS STAMPED WITH CIRCLES AND A DRY BRUSH WAS USED TO MAKE FROST IN THE FOREGROUND.  THEY ALSO USED  A CIRCULAR MOTION WITH A PAINTBRUSH BLENDING A TEXTURING GREEN AND YELLOW PAINT ON A SEPARATE PAPER AND USED IT TO CUT OUT PUMPKIN VINE AND LEAVES.  A CRESCENT MOON WAS PLACED IN THE SKY.  THE RESULTS ARE VERY NICE AND I KNOW WILL BE HANGING AMONG YOUR FALL DECORATIONS NEXT YEAR.  MICHAEL'S IS ALWAYS HAPPY TO FRAME YOUR KINDER'S ART.  WHAT A WONDERFUL GIFT FOR GRANDPA AND GRANDMA!

Do you want to build a snowman?  The students have been working on one of the cutest projects ever!  I giggle each time I walk past their work.  What a riot to watch them sprinkle glitter on their work, all over the table, the floor, in their hair, my hair and everywhere!  But, how precious to watch them try their personal best to clean up the mess afterward!  The project is so adorable and will be on display soon.  Another one to have framed for sure.  


HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!!!!!!!   Eric Carle is one of my favorite artists and authors.  The beautiful papers that he creates to make his spectacular collages are so fascinating.  We read the book, Draw Me a Star. The Kinders used primary and secondary colors to sponge on white paper creating some interesting textures and colors.  I don't let them use or clean their sponges so that they discover what happens when colors are mixed together.  It is so rewarding to hear their giggles of delights when they discover that red sponged over yellow will make orange, yellow over blue will make green etc...  They used a toothbrush to spray white tempera over black paper.  When we get back from break I will be using another wonderful book that talks of the Epiphany and we will incorporate the story of the Wiseman into our beautiful collage using the painted paper to cut out a star and talk about how we can use the stars rays to show excitement and movement in the final project.  I love it!!!!

Tactile texture is texture you can feel with your fingers. I set out a dozen different materials with various textures for the students to explore.  They cut and glued the differing textures to make a texture collage.  It is soooo fun to watch them experiment with the materials.  Some of the objects had a different texture on the reverse side so they had to make choices to which side they would glue down and which side they would display.  

Somebunny loves you!  We are learning the difference between shape and form.  Shape is measured by length and width.  Form is measured by length, width and depth.  The students are making a collage with 3 dimensional qualities that also give texture to their work.  The really are adorable and very spring like, we really need that promise of spring!

The Fish Fry was a perfect time to showcase the Kinder's two fish themed artworks.  We made construction paper fish using heart shapes for Valentines Day!  We also made a mixed medium work using shades and tints of blue to make our background water for a construction paper fish and seaweed.  Hope you enjoyed them as much as we did making them!

When I found out I would be teaching Kinders again, the first thing I thought of was I GET TO DO THE PICASSO HANDS HOLDING A FLORAL BOUQUET!!! I LOVE THIS PROJECT AND EVERY MOM OUT THERE IS GOING TO FRAME THIS ONE.  I METICULOUSLY TRACED YOUR CHILD'S HAND AND  CUT THEM OUT.  WHAT A KEEPSAKE TREASURE YOU WILL HAVE!  
 
THE STUDENTS WILL MAKE A PORTFOLIO TO STORE THEIR WORK IN ART CLASS. THEY WILL BRING HOME THEIR PORTFOLIO AT THE END OF THE YEAR.

Joaquin Torres-Garcia (Uruguayan), New York City-Bird's Eye View c. 1920 was our inspiration for 
"Lines in My Neighborhood."  There are 5 basic types of lines in art.  The artists used crayons to draw lines conveying the neighborhoods they live in.  They were to use details to show the characteristics of the architecture that they live within.  Do they live in a brick, stone, vinyl sided or wood building?  What shapes are their windows?  Details were drawn with crayon.  The houses were finished using watercolor over the  crayon detail making a crayon resist artwork.
 
Van Gogh is one of my favorite artists.  I think it is because he left so much documentation behind for us to get to know him.  In his letters to his brother Theo, we really get to know the depths of despair and the highs of jubilation.  I like to read firsthand what the artists say about themselves and not what others say about them.  The students studied his Bedroom in Arles, 1888,  and drew their bedrooms.  They were to draw them realistically showing "details, details details , like dirty socks on the floor!   We must have great housekeeping rules here at Mishawaka Catholic.  Their rooms are pretty neat and tidy.  The details are fantastic!

Zeruah Higley Guernsey Casell, American, 1832-35 was our inspiration for a fall leaf collage. Make sure you bring your rakes with you when visiting St. Bavo.  The hallway leading to the first grade rooms are lined with their beautiful fall leaf collages.  The students used several techniques to paint paper:  string, toothbrush, sponges and stamps.  We added glitter to a few leaves to make a beautiful sparkle!  You can almost hear the crunching sound of the leaves as you pass through the hallway!!!

We looked at the work of Marc Chagall, Russian, and his use of showing depth in his work.  We talked about overlapping and how artists use it to convey deep space in their work.  The students are making a snowman mixed media sponging white tempera over blue construction paper and then using 3 different colors of green construction paper to overlap 3 different evergreen trees.  

We worked on a winter woodscape using pre-cut paper strips in various sizes and tints and shades of white, gray and black.  The students added a hollowed out section in their widest tree by cutting an oval/circular shape to add an animal or bird peeking out.  They then added snow using the end of their brush dipped in white tempera. I was very happy with the end results.They are hanging by the office and in the cafeteria.

Piet Mondrian, Dutch, Broadway Boogie-Woogie, 1942-43 was the inspiration for our project.  He began painting traditional landscapes, but soon made them brighter and more stylized.  His work became more linear and abstract, until it was a grid of black lines with blocks of primary colors.  He is the leading member of the Dutch art movement known as De Stijl (the style).  The students used black strips of  paper placing them perpendicular on white background.  They then cut out a heart shape and using their rulers drew black perpendicular lines on their heart.  They then used markers in primary colors (red, yellow, blue) to fill in rectangles and squares.  

The students are learning about primary and secondary colors.  We have used several mediums to mix colors and each gives a different result.  The students used crayons, tissue paper and tempera paint.  They learned how to blend green using a yellow and blue crayon, red tissue over blue tissue to make purple and yellow and red tempera  to make orange.  My favorite project was their vase of sunflowers.  I set up a still life of sunflowers, wheat, leaves and berries  for them to paint from their point of view.  The results were very good.

The St. Bavo Fish Fry is the perfect opportunity to show case student work!  The whole community can enjoy the talent of our students!  The first grade artists made underwater sea collages using several different mediums and textures.  They were to show overlap in their work to create depth.  I hope you all enjoyed them while you were waiting in line or eating in the cafeteria!  

We have been trying to usher  spring in the art room.  The first grade artists exploded various colors of watercolor on a 12 X 18 paper and watched how the colors blended into each other.  They added green around their color explosions.  After the paintings were dry, they added sharpie to define the shapes as flowers and vegetation.  They are beautiful and many teachers seeing them commented that they would love to frame them and hang them in their houses!  I told my classes that I bet there will be a lot of moms framing these paintings!  

Monet's Waterlily pond at Giverny is the inspiration for our waterlily 3 dimensional mixed medium composition.  The students used watercolor in cool colors for the water background.  They then used construction paper and tissue paper to make their 3 dimensional waterlillies.  The result is very soft and very pretty if I should say so myself.  I love them!!!!!!!

Bugs. We read a wonderful story by an author that spoke at a young author's conference I attended years ago.  The story is so hilarious that every time I read it I crack up!  The artist's reactions are so funny and gets their schemata activated and ready to sculpt.  We are learning about form having 3 dimensions H X W X D.  They will paint their bugs and add things they will bring in from nature such as sticks, stones, pinecones, etc.  
 
 
 
 
THE STUDENTS WILL MAKE A PORTFOLIO IN ART CLASS TO STORE THEIR WORK.  THEY WILL BRING THE PORTFOLIO HOME AT THE END OF THE SCHOOL YEAR.

Heron Martinez, Mexican, Church c 1960 is a beautiful example of pattern and color.  St. Bavo is a beautiful place of worship.  We compared and contrasted our church with the clay sculpture.  The students are without a playground so I gave them the challenge of designing their own ideal place to play.  The artists created a "dream" playground using construction paper strips.  They could chose to make it 3 dimensional if they wished.  The results are colorful and stunning.  

Claude Monet, French, Poplar's on the Epte is a summer painting that we studied, but we looked to see what colors Monet would have used if the painting was done in October.  Fall is in the air.  We talked about the cool colors the artist used in the sky and how the contrast that using oranges, yellow and reds would change the mood of the painting.  The students made tissue paper and pastel fall leaf compositions.  The leaves were cut out of a tissue paper collage that each student made from warm colors.  They glued the leaves onto a cool background of pastel swirls that give the feeling of falling leaves.

Joseph Stella, American, the Voice of the City of New York/The White Way l, 1920 - 1922 was the inspiration for our non-objective painting.  The students studied parts of the painting using parts that they felt were fascinating to them.  They were to use all 5 kinds of lines and then show a pattern in one area that they chose.  The students used pastel, sharpie and watercolor.  

Vincent Van Gogh's Starry Night was the inspiration for this swirling winter sky and silhouette landscape.  I was sooo tickled to hear all the "oooo" and "ahs" when the students painted a purple and blue night sky and then sprinkled salt over it to create a frosty winter sky.  The chemical reaction is fascinating to watch.  Some told me that this was the best art class ever!!!!!! That is why I teach.  There is nothing but magic that happens in my art room and millions of messes!!   Ahhhh but it is sooo worth it!  I really am exhausted at the end of the day.

We are working on seeing value by adding white to a color.  We are also recognizing that to create depth we make things higher, smaller and lighter in value.  The students will use blue and white to create snow and green and white to make evergreen trees.  They will cut out evergreen organic shapes in various sizes and place them in strategic places creating depth.  By adding whte to a color we make a tint of a color.  By adding black to a color we make a shade.

Pi"cat"so is one of my favorite projects.  We studied how Pablo Picasso changed as an artist.  We looked at some of his abstract artworks.  I have worked with Miss B for many years and  know how much she adores her sweet kittys.  So second grade is a purrfect place to do this project!  The artists divided a paper into fourths which gave us the perfect opportunity to talk about fractions.  In each section, the students were to draw a head, 4 legs, body and tail.  The students used watercolor over crayon to design different patterns in each of their  kitty's body.  They cut out each body part and assembled it in a representational or abstract way.  The results are the cat's meow! 



The students are working on a spring watercolor of a sunset  and a budding tree.  The students were awestruck by the way the watercolor expoded on the paper blending together a beautiful result.  The tree is done in crayon  and sharpie then a q-tip loaded with tempera is sponged lightly over the budding tree branches.  The results are stunning and Miss B's class are hung in the 2nd grade hallway.  I am so impressed with these mixed medium paintings!

Every year when we see the first burst of yellow in the form of a dandelion it is so exciting and the color is vibrant!  I know, most people hate dandelions but if we would all socially accept them as perennials, wouldn't that make out lives a lot easier?  And, there are nutritious values in those festive weeds!   I have been working on a new project for a couple weeks and will let the kids chose a black and white dandeion inspired by black and white photograph of a dandelion in full bloom and starting to seed or a bright yellow in your face dandelion.  Can't wait to see what they come up with.  One man's weed is another art teacher's treasure!!!!

We are working on a mixed media composition using sharpie, crayon/pastel, construction paper and watercolor.  We are learning about emphasis and focal point and how an artist conveys it in an artwork.  We are making a tropical bird sitting on a branch in the center surrounded by a border of leaves.  I am so excited to see my students' acccomplishments.

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